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Banana Bread with Peanut Butter Glaze

By Chef Megan Joy / October 24, 2012

It seems a lot of people I meet up here have given up on the idea of being able to enjoy tasty, high altitude banana bread.

“You know what I really crave? Banana bread.” I hear it all the time.

Let’s change that.

I modified one of my favorite quick bread recipes and it came out really, really well. I was rather proud. The bread isn’t too oily or heavy. You can taste the banana. The texture isn’t gummy. And the entire middle bakes up to a peak, rather than collapsing.

Then I took things even further and topped “the perfect loaf” with a peanut butter glaze, roasted peanuts, and mini chocolate chips.

Bliss.

One of my best friends from my childhood recently moved out here and we’ve been spending a lot of time catching up again. She is a huge peanut butter fan, so perhaps I dreamed up this recipe with her in mind.

We took the dogs out on a late afternoon hike the other day…even with no leaves the mountains are still gorgeous!

Don’t get me wrong- even ‘dressed up’, this treat is perfectly okay to eat for breakfast. And like all quick breads, it tastes even better when cut into super thick slices.

How to bake this high altitude adjusted recipe:

Banana Bread with Peanut Butter Glaze

 

4.3 from 6 reviews
Banana Bread with Peanut Butter Glaze
Recipe type: High Altitude Baking
 
Ingredients
  • For the bread:
  • 6.8 oz banana puree, about 2½ very ripe bananas mashed
  • Scant 1 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Pinch of ground cinnamon (optional)
  • 1½ teaspoons vanilla extract
  • ⅓ cup canola or grapeseed oil
  • 1½ cups all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon plus ⅛ teaspoon baking powder
  • Scant ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • 3 oz water
  • For the glaze:
  • ½ cup creamy peanut butter
  • ⅔ cup milk
  • 1½ cups powdered sugar
  • 1½ teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ⅔ cup chopped roasted peanuts
  • Handful mini chocolate chips
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 350 F.
  2. Grease a 9 x 5" loaf pan and line the bottom with a strip of parchment paper.
  3. For the bread: In a large bowl, whisk together the banana puree, sugar, eggs, salt, cinnamon, vanilla, and oil until smooth.
  4. Add the flour, baking powder, and baking soda, stir until just combined.
  5. Whisk in the water until the mixture is smooth. Pour into prepared baking pan.
  6. Bake for about 40-45 minutes, or until the edges are a golden brown, the center is peaked, and a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean.
  7. Cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then invert onto a cooling rack. Cool completely before glazing.
  8. For the glaze: In a bowl, whisk together the peanut butter, milk, powdered sugar, salt, and vanilla until smooth. If the glaze is too thick, add more milk. Pour over the cooled loaf, top with peanuts and mini chips.
 

Note: This was recipe was adapted for high altitude baking. To bake at sea level: Increase sugar to 1 cup, baking powder to 1 teaspoon, and baking soda to 1/2 teaspoon. Baking times may vary slightly.

About the author

Chef Megan Joy

24comments
Katrina - October 26, 2012

All I can say is “thank you.” I moved to the mountains from the Great Plains over 10 years ago, and despite living at several different elevations (currently at 6,900′), I have never been able to master the art of baking at high altitude. Which completely frustrated me, since I love baking, especially bread. Every time I moved to a new town, I would immediately bake a loaf of bread, hoping that this time, it would finally work, only to be disappointed. After my most recent failure (which involved throwing a horrible, sunken, doughy loaf across the kitchen in frustration), I began my website search again, and stumbled across your blog. I baked banana bread last night, and ate my first good batch of homemade bread in years. I thank you, and I guarantee my husband thanks you.

Reply
Chef Megan Joy - October 27, 2012

That warms my heart Katrina! A huge ‘you’re welcome’ to you!

Reply
ae - October 30, 2012

greetings from flagstaff at 7k’! this is wicked awesome! i discovered your site last month, and have been running extra miles in the mountains due to my increased baked goods intake. the molten chocolate cakes have been a HUGE hit [btw, those are stupid good eaten COLD out of the icebox the following day!] and the pumpkin crumble muffins are rapidly devoured by our kiddos. i went to your site last week looking for a banana bread recipe and didn’t find one, so this is super timely. thanks for sharing this recipe. best, ae

Reply
    Chef Megan Joy - November 2, 2012

    I’m so glad to hear this site has been helpful for you! Feel free to suggest any high altitude recipes you’re on the hunt for in the future.

    Reply
High Altitude Gluten-Free Jam Swirled Sweet Potato Bread — High Altitude Bakes - February 28, 2013

[…] puree so I decided to play around with my trusty Vanilla-Scented Butternut Squash Quick Bread and Banana Bread with Peanut Butter Glaze formula. It makes the best quick breads- moist, not too greasy, light texture yet substantial […]

Reply
tricia - March 29, 2013

Is this the correct amount of milk for the glaze? Mine came out super runny this time. (Maybe because I used a natural, you-have-to-stir-it-before-each-use peanut butter?)
Made my first batch in Quito, Ecuador while I was visiting a friend. Delicious! So when I got home, I made it the first chance I got 🙂 Thanks for a great recipe!

Reply
    Chef Megan Joy - March 30, 2013

    Hi Tricia. This was the correct amount of milk I used in my notes, however, sometimes with baking the recipes can take on a mind of their own! Next time you make the glaze, I suggest slowly adding milk a little at a time until you get the consistency you want. You may find that you don’t need the full amount. The glaze will also firm up a little bit once it sets. Happy baking!

    Reply
MeganZ - July 2, 2013

I’m throwing out all my other banana bread recipes, or at least letting them collect dust until I move back to Illinois someday- this turned out great! But the glaze turned out super runny for me, and I used normal PB. I went back to check the comments to see if the amount of milk was wrong for the glaze…and sure enough, someone else had the same problem. I’ll just add the milk more slowly next time as you suggest.
Thanks!

Reply
    Chef Megan Joy - July 4, 2013

    Hi Megan, maybe I should review my notes and see if less milk is necessary in this glaze recipe. I’m glad the bread came out well for you. Happy baking!

    Reply
stacy - October 21, 2013

i moved to Park City from Indiana and have LOVED your site! this banana bread is THE BOMB.

Reply
Connie - June 21, 2014

Hi. I am not familiar with the term scant. Could you please enlighten me. By the way, love your blog. Thank for helping out with recipes for high altitude. I moved from Texas to Ecuador about a month ago. So I need all the help I can get.

Reply
Lauren - August 22, 2014

You’re kind of my go-to site for something I haven’t made before since most sites say they’re high altitude but are really only at 5,000ft! Plus, I know you’re well schooled so the recipes are coming from a valid source and will turn out. So disappointed on this one though. I actually don’t have trouble with banana bread up here at 8,000ft but I don’t have a recipe I use all the time. This one is going to be fluffy in the middle, but took so long to bake that it is way too dark on the outside. Almost crispy.:( bummer!

Reply
    Chef Megan Joy - August 26, 2014

    Hi Lauren, I’m sorry to hear your banana bread baked funny. If you make this recipe again, I would double check your oven temperature. Is your oven properly calibrated, does it have any hot spots that are going to bake the bread faster than it should? Is the bread positioned in the middle of the oven, not too close to the top or bottom? Preheat your oven to 350 F as directed and then after putting in the bread, reduce your oven temperature to 325 F for a low and slow bake.

    Reply
Louise - September 22, 2014

Moved to Breckenridge 10 months ago and this was my first attempt at high altitude baking. Was the best thing I have ever baked!! I doubled the recipe in a 10×10 inch pan – got a huge 3 inch rise and it is super moist! I made a coffee glaze (as my hubby had already eaten the peanut butter!) . Thanks so much! Looking at my next bake now 🙂

Reply
Louise - September 22, 2014

Definitely 5 stars

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Louise - September 22, 2014

Worked perfectly at 9600ft!

Reply
Nick - October 31, 2014

Love this recipe. Also love the snickerdoodle cookies which after a little experimenting turned out great with small cubed apple too! I’m trying this banana bread for the first time after moving back to the midwest for some thank you loafs in foil mini loaf pans approx 5×3 x 1.5 , aside from the non altitude adjustments are there special considerations for bake time with these containers? Or do i just need to keep an eye on them? Thanks!

Reply
    Chef Megan Joy - November 5, 2014

    Hi Nick, we love this recipe too! For sea level baking, you are correct- just adjust the leaveners as advised and keep an eye on them during baking. For smaller loaves they will definitely have a shorter baking time.

    Reply
Martha - May 21, 2015

Hi there, I just got done making this banana bread and I ran into some trouble with the baking time. My loaf pan is dark metal, does that matter? I set my timer for 40 minutes and it was getting dark around the edges but the top was raw so I let it go the other 5 minutes and the edges were now quite dark, top still very light and raw. Might you know what my problem was?

Reply
    Chef Megan Joy - May 22, 2015

    Hi Martha! It sounds like your baking pan could be the culprit here. Typically dark metal baking pans bake the product much, much faster than other types, and this can cause uneven baking. If this is your only loaf pan, I suggest lowering the oven temperature 25 degrees or so next time.

    Reply
Lisa Drake - September 11, 2015

Another winner, Megan! Just enjoyed this with a cup of chocolate chip tea! 🙂

Reply
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